Selected New Releases November 18, 2016

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The Albums

We begin this week’s batch of new releases with Angels Bend Closer from Guelph’s artistic ace Jane Siberry. She is best known for her big radio hit “One More Colour” from 1985. The sparkling new album can best be described perhaps as alternative adult contemporary.

Toronto dream pop duo Twin Rains is all about Automatic Hands, its debut album. The songs are very well written and effectively engender a subdued mood. Check out the delicious funky track “Flash Burn”. The album barely has a dull moment making it one of our top picks among this week’s releases.

Nicely done as well is Chérie, les heures from Montreal’s François Roy. Essentially, this is a singer-songwriter work, though with some alternative vibes kneaded in for some smile-inducing thrills.

La Crete, Alberta is home to country superstar duo High Valley. The Brothers made the iTunes Top 10 with new album Dear Life. High Valley is one of the top hopefuls for a Canadian country breakthrough internationally, and the new album, slickly produced, will definitely rev up the momentum.

From Jane Siberry’s hometown of Guelph, there is another star. Her name is Andrea Lindsay. The JUNO award winner was raised an Anglophone but learned French as a second language and opted to make Franco music especially with husband Luc de Larochellière. On new album Entre le jazz et la java she tries her hand at jazz and succeeds brilliantly.

Toronto electronic outfit Diana is back with new album Familiar Touch which is getting rave reviews. Add ours to the list. The trio is in top form when cooking up more creative tracks; “Cry” is a standout for us, but the whole album is an enjoyable ride.

Heading on up to Edmonton, 100 Mile House delivers new album Hiraeth, the married couple’s fourth. This should knock the wind out of those who love roots music on the smooth and reflective rather than noisy, raucous side. The arrangements are very impressive and beautiful.

Traditional folk doesn’t get much better than Regina’s The Dead South. Illusion & Doubt is perky and fun. The fourpiece band will get you slapping your knee along with these sweet ditties.

London’s Rose Cora Perry presents rock album Onto the Floor. She provides a nice range from Patti Smith type piano rock to the swaggering pump of “Empty” for which she recently released a music video.

From south riverside Quebec comes rapper Saye and album Ultimatum. He is joined by some of the biggest names of the genre in Canada like Souldia and Koriass.

Guelph artists have certainly been busy this week. Jim Guthrie joins JJ Ipsen to concoct the instrumental soundtrack of construction and management simulation video game Planet Coaster entitled You, Me & Gravity. You’ll have to wait a bit for the amusement park game to hit the shelves but you can enjoy the music now.

The EPs

Dance music (house) with some R&B inflection is done incredibly well on new EP Another Chance from Sandy Duperval. She’s based in Canada’s indie music capital of Montreal, and the EP is so good we wish there would be more Canadian artists making this kind of music. A collaboration with Kiesza would be choice.

Hawksley Workman teams up with Thomas D’Arcy as Tommy Hawkins on alternative rock EP Amy. With quirky vocals, this should hit the spot for fans of the genre.

Montreal’s Lydia Kepinski offers some alternative singer-songwriter cool on her EP entitled … EP. The songs are exceptionally well-crafted; thus, we really look forward to her career as it unfolds.

Last, but not least, the destination is Winnipeg! The five members of band Lanikai, “like the Hawaiian beach they get their name from, mix the serene and the stormy, pulling together lush, sparkling alt-pop vibes and swaggering ‘60s soul groove to create a timeless, distinctive sound,” as stated on the group’s Facebook page, a perfect description of the fine, self-titled EP.

Other Cool Stuff

Vancouver’s alluring alt-pop female trio The Katherines will be releasing a new LP in the new year. Paul Janz’ son Colin who records under the name Frederick is featured on track “Better Off Now” which is available on iTunes. Frederick himself has launched sumptuous single “Silver Light”.

Also of note, hot folky award winning artist Safia Nolin has released a collection of covers in Reprises Vol. 1. which is in the iTunes Top 10.

A number of Christmas albums are coming out these days. We will profile them at some point in December.

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Headlines and Footdots for 16 November 2016

Dallas Smith’s Autograph Inked at the Top

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Dallas Smith’s hit single “Autograph” has hit #1 on the Country Airplay chart. It is the British Columbian’s second chart-topping song since “Wastin’ Gas” crowned country in January 2015. “Autograph” is the first #1 for a Canadian country artist since Brett Kissel’s “Airwaves” in September 2015. Dallas is the first Canadian Country artist to score multiple number one songs since Dean Brody picked up his second summit smasher in 2013.

C’est La Vingt

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It is remarkable that Canadian soul singer Bobby Bazini has scored two platinum albums and four JUNO nominations without landing a hit single. Then again, that may be due his style not fitting into a radio climate ruled by EDM bangers, acoustic guitar ditties, warbled R&B, and ranting rap. As we have seen throughout the years, however, when an irresistibly delicious song comes out, the gate keepers succumb to its charms. Bobby Bazini’s “C’est La Vie”, not yet significantly airing on CHR radio, has made the Top 20 on AC and is threatening to on Hot AC. What is more eyebrow-raising is that it has vaulted itself up to #20 on iTunes. We will keep our eyes on its progress.

Red and Blue Angels

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Artistic pop specialist Jane Siberry of Guelph, ON will be releasing new album Angels Bend Closer on Friday (November 18, 2016). Jane is best known for “One More Colour” a Top 40 hit in 1985. She was one of the artists who participated in the “Tears Are Not Enough”, Northern Lights project that same year.

Canadian EDM duo Adventure Club is set to release one of the slickest albums of 2016: Red // Blue. Due out on December 2, it will be the two-time JUNO nominee’s first full-length album. Adventure Club, from Montreal, scored Top 40 hit “Wonder” in 2014.

The Biebs’ Swiss Army Night

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Justin Bieber will be performing at the American Music Awards, but not from Trumpland, rather from Schneider-Ammann territory. Yes, The Biebs will perform from his Purpose tour in Zurich, Switzerland, marking his sixth time performing at the AMAs. Two other Canadians will be performing at the gala on Sunday (November 20, 2016), namely Shawn Mendes and The Weeknd. Maple leaf artists are nominated for 23+ awards at the fan-voted show.

In a recent interview, Bieber’s manager Scooter Braun was asked what he anticipates for Justin with respect to the Grammy Awards. Scooter made the following reply:

My point of view on Justin’s album is very simple: It deserves all the accolades, and the reason is as follows: He was hated. There’s not a voter out there who was voting for Justin Bieber. Adele is phenomenal, but we all love Adele. Her latest album had 900k pre-orders before we even heard a song. It’s sacrilegious to say anything bad about Beyoncé; we love her. People didn’t love Justin Bieber. They trashed-talked him, despised him. Big executives who are supposed to be on his team told me his career was over. And his album changed all that, to the point where he’s had more number ones on his album than any of the other people we’re talking about, and sold more copies than anyone ever dreamed this album would do.

I think that when we’re judging on the Grammys, we’re supposed to judge based on the music. If we do, this album is undeniable because it made us love Justin Bieber again—a feat that everyone thought was impossible. People told me it’s impossible to make a teenage act that’s hated become an adult. Justin Bieber is at the height of his career; he’s bigger than he was before, based on Purpose, and I hope that people recognize that, put their feelings about him aside and judge him based on the music. I think everyone can agree this was a great album and it deserves the appreciation.

Erin Bryanvich

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Bryan Adams bumped into Hollywood actress Julia Roberts on Monday (November 14, 2016) at the memorial for director Garry Marshall held in Los Angeles, USA. He shared this photo.

Ruth B Is In My Dreams

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Alessia Cara may be the only female Canadian soloist receiving significant radio support these days, but Ruth B is attempting to squash the tokenism. Ruth who hails from the northern metropolis of Edmonton launched her career via the Shawn Mendes route of now defunct video platform Vine. Her 2015 single “Lost Boy” became a hit both domestically and internationally, now certified in Canada at triple platinum. She is following up with “In My Dreams” which heralds her debut full-length album. The track was produced by Joel Little who has worked with Ellie Goulding, Lorde, and Sam Smith. The song was featured in an episode of hit ABC series Once Upon a Time. We embed the lyric video below which in five days is well over 100k views.

Diamond Artist Corey Hart Releases His First Album in 16 Years

Corey Hart - Ten Thousand HorsesHe is one of only 13 domestic artists to author a diamond album, and has scored 19 Top 40 hits, one of which finished the year 1985 as its biggest song. He is one of the all-time biggest names in music but decided to disappear one day. Montréal’s Corey Hart fell in love with Julie Masse, a young woman on whom the industry was pinning its hopes to become the next Céline Dion. The two of them essentially decided to retire from their recording careers and focus on raising their children (and living it up in exotic locales like The Bahamas and Barcelona no doubt). We thought we would never see a new release from Corey Hart again, and yet, from out of the blue, he has launched his first album in 16 years, Ten Thousand Horses.

Although it has a run time of over 40 minutes, this is not an LP in the strictest sense. To celebrate the 30th anniversary of the release of his first single, “Sunglasses at Night,” Corey decided to put on a show at the Bell Centre in Montréal on May 31, 2014, billed “One Night: Three Decades of Music”. This led to his recording a new song, “Ten Thousand Horses,” with 80s icon Jane Siberry. A Franco version with his wife Julie Masse was added. The new disc contains four versions of the song in total (additionally a guitar version and radio version). Most of the songs on the album are previously recorded, unreleased tracks or remakes. An example of the latter is “Without You,” from album Jade, reworked into “Falling From Graceland”.

With the new album, Corey Hart can now rightfully claim “three decades of music”: 1980s, 1990s, and 2010s (no albums were released in the 2000s decade). Ten Thousand Horses is available through iTunes only. Oh, yes, and whenever recording artists declare a last album, concert, or song, do not believe it. With music in their blood they will never be able to resist the temptation to create anew, in some form, and we are grateful for that.  iTunes

ATF Tunes: The sphere becomes a line

While studying music and microbiology at the University of Guelph, she released her debut album in 1981 on an independent label. Critically-acclaimed No Borders Here followed with the underground hit “Mimi on the Beach”. Her third album The Speckless Sky came out in 1985 resulting in the Top 30 radio hit “One More Colour“, one of our all-time favourite songs by a Canadian artist, a singer-songwriter often compared to Kate Bush, named Jane Siberry. “One More Colour” bridges the new wave and adult contemporary genres and showcases Siberry’s strong artistic, creative, and poetic skills.

Lyrics

“is it lasting?”
and in asking
the sphere becomes a line
a dotted line
and to follow it
you must make a jump each time

a dotted page
a dotted hillside
a blast of dots
a blind reader
a flock of sheep
a blast of trumpet shots

[CHORUS:]
here – all we have here is sky
all the sky is is blue
all that blue is is one more colour now

a basket of apples
by the back door
beneath the sweater pegs
the autumn leaves
lift along the street
a pair of dancing legs

same as the vendor
who likes to sing
as loudly as he can
and all he says is
it suits me fine
that’s the way I am

[CHORUS]

I’ve seen this THING you won’t believe
why it’s big – bigger than the biggest trees
high as the mountains
wide as the widest skies
(and that’s both sides)
well – at least as big as me

speak a little softer
work a little louder
shoot less with more care
sing a little sweeter
and love a little longer
and soon you will be there

[CHORUS]
these are some reasons
and same as the seasons
they hold and then they fly
the goatless ledge
‘neath the honkless geese
in the speckless sky
I hear you

Summary

Song: “One More Colour”
Album: The Speckless Sky
Year: 1985
Artist: Jane Siberry
Origin: Guelph

More songs…

“Tears Are Not Enough” by Northern Lights

Notable Canadian band manager Bruce Allen organized a project to record a charity single for African famine relief in response to Britain’s “Do They Know It’s Christmas?” Jim Vallance in an interview told the story of how things came together in writing and recording the song “Tears Are Not Enough” sung by a supergroup of Canadian artists called Northern Lights.

…in 1985, David [Foster] returned to Vancouver for a year. He and his wife Rebecca bought a house in the same neighbourhood where Bryan Adams and I lived, but we didn’t see much of them. One day I ran into David in the lobby of Little Mountain Sound Studio, where he was producing an album for Paul Hyde and Bob Rock’s group, The Payolas. He approached me in a panic and said, “You have a home studio, right?” I replied that I did.

Visibly excited, David told me he’d just got off the phone with Quincy Jones, who’d just finished recording a Michael Jackson / Lionel Ritchie song for African famine relief called “We Are The World”. Quincy played the song for David over the phone, and said he wanted David to record a Canadian song for Africa — and it had to be finished in the next week or two so it could be included on the U.S. album release!

“We Are The World” was written in response to Bob Geldoff’s “Do They Know It’s Christmas”, recorded and released the year before (1984). Geldoff’s song raised millions of dollars for Africa, and had already made a significant difference to those suffering from drought and famine. Quincy hoped that a Canadian song might help make a difference too.

David already had a melody, borrowed from a song he’d been working on, and he had a title, “Tears Are Not Enough”, which had been provided by Paul Hyde and Bob Rock. It was nearly twenty years later (2004) when I finally heard the story behind the “title”:

Paul and Bob had been in the studio with Foster on the day that Quincy Jones called. Several weeks earlier they’d written a song called “Tears Are Not Enough”, and after the call from Quincy they played their song for David, thinking it might be suitable for the Famine Relief recording. “So, what do you think?” they asked, when they’d finished presenting the song. “Nice title”, David replied.

The next morning (Friday, February 1, 1985) David arrived at my home studio. He played me his melody on the piano. It was a pretty ballad with an interesting, circular chord progression. He also mentioned Paul and Bob’s title, “Tears Are Not Enough”, which I thought was excellent.

With the melody and the title we had enough to get started, so began recording the track right away. Using his Emulator synthesizer David laid down a piano, followed by a Moog bass, then a bell sound. I added drums and percussion. An hour or two later we had a “basic track” (it was only intended to be a quick “demo” recording, but it worked so well we ended up using it for the final recording).

Then we started working on the lyrics:
We can close the distance
Only we can make the difference
Don’t you know that tears are not enough

It was a good start, but David had to rush away for a session with The Payolas, promising to return the following day. I continued work on the lyrics while my wife Rachel [Paiement] wrote a few lines in French — after all, it was a Canadian song for Africa!

The next day Bryan Adams arrived from Los Angeles and hurried over to help. He looked at the lyrics I’d written so far and immediately suggested an improvement. “How about ‘we can BRIDGE the distance’?”, he said. It was perfect, and with that we were off and running.

We finished the lyric later that evening, then Bryan and Rachel recorded the vocals. The demo was completed at 4:00 a.m. the next morning.

Meanwhile, David enlisted Bryan’s manager Bruce Allen to help assemble a roster of performers. Bruce was well-connected in the music industry, and in quick succession Joni Mitchell and Neil Young agreed to participate. Then Kim Mitchell and Gordon Lightfoot. Burton Cummings came on board, and so did Geddy Lee and Corey Hart.

Comedians John Candy and Catherine O’Hara offered their services, along with legendary jazz pianist Oscar Peterson and David Letterman sidekick Paul Shaffer. Dan Hill, Jane Sibbery, Sylvia Tyson, Robert Charlebois … the list of participants grew by the hour.

I suggested we record the vocals at Manta Studios [in Toronto], where I’d recorded Bryan Adams’ first album (and also Barney Bentall, Lisa Dal Bello and Cano). The room was big enough to accommodate a large group, and I also knew that veteran engineer Hayward Parrott could handle the complex task of recording 30 soloists … plus a chorus of 50!

Michael Godin (A&M Records) contacted Manta owner Andy Hermant, who generously donated the studio. On Saturday (February 9, 1985) we flew to Toronto to prepare for the mammoth recording session planned for the following day.

During the flight we reviewed the lyric sheet and the list of artists and determined who would sing which line. We decided the song should begin with Canadian legend Gordon Lightfoot (“As everyday goes by …”), then move to Burton Cummings (“How can we close our eyes …”), then to Anne Murray, Joni Mitchell, and so on.

The session took place on Sunday, February 10, 1985. It was a bitter cold day, but hundreds of fans gathered outside Manta to watch the “stars” arrive. Gordon Lightfoot drove himself to the studio in a pick-up truck. Neil Young and Joni Mitchell arrived by taxi. Platinum Blonde arrived in a white stretch limo.

Just as Quincy Jones had done in Los Angeles, Foster taped a poster in the studio lobby that said, “Leave your egos at the door”. Everyone gave 200 percent, and at the end of the day we had the makings of a magical record.

One of the funniest moments happened during Neil Young’s performance. He’d sung his line once or twice already, but Foster still wasn’t happy and asked Neil to try again. When Neil asked why, David told him he was out of tune. “That’s my style, man”, Neil shot back.

For me, one of the highlights was sitting on the studio floor a few feet from Joni Mitchell while she carved graceful lines in the air with her hands as she sang. Another special moment was meeting Richard Manuel, singer and pianist for “The Band”. In fact, Joni Mitchell and “The Band” are two of my biggest musical influences. I was in “fan heaven”, meeting them and hearing them sing lyrics I’d written!

After completing the vocal session in Toronto, David and I returned to Vancouver and booked time at Pinewood Studios and Little Mountain Sound where more instruments were added to the track, including Loverboy’s Doug Johnson and Paul Dean, who contributed keyboards and guitar. Steven Denroche, a member of the Vancouver Symphony, was called in to play French Horn…

One important Canadian artist unable to attend the Toronto recording session was Bruce Cockburn, who was performing in Germany at the time. Cockburn ‘s manager, Bernie Finkelstein, wondered if there wasn’t a way Bruce could record his vocal at a studio in Germany and have it edited into the finished product at a later date. It was a nice idea, but to meet our deadline Bruce’s contribution would have to be filmed and recorded sometime in the next 48 hours. In a moment of weakness I volunteered to fly to Germany!

The good news is, Air Canada provided a free ticket. The bad news is, there were no direct fights — so I had to fly from Vancouver to Toronto, Toronto to London, London to Frankfurt, and Frankfurt to Hamburg … a 44-hour round-trip. I arrived in Hamburg just in time to catch Bruce’s performance at a club on Tuesday evening. I met him backstage, for the first time, after the show.

I’d brought a cassette tape of the song, which Bruce hadn’t heard yet. But before I could even play the tape, Bruce dropped a bomb. He said he hadn’t yet decided if he wanted to participate in the project!

Bernie had neglected to tell me that Bruce hadn’t made up his mind yet — and I’d just spent 22 hours on a #$&@ airplane! In my sleep-deprived, jet-lagged stupor my first reaction was to reach across the table and grab Bruce by the throat with both hands. Instead, I used every ounce of diplomacy I could muster. I told Bruce how magical the session in Toronto had been … how it was truly a special project, and that everyone was looking forward to his involvement, which was true!

Bruce eventually came around, and he agreed to meet me at a Hamburg recording studio the following morning. It took less than an hour to complete Bruce’s audio and video recording, then it was back to the airport for the 22-hour return flight to Vancouver (via Frankfurt, London and Toronto).

I met one of the film people at the airport in Toronto during my two-hour lay-over, and I handed him the Cockburn footage to edit into the video. After spending a much-needed night in my own bed in Vancouver, I flew to Los Angeles the next morning to deliver Bruce’s audio track. Foster and his assistant Chris Earthy met me at the airport, and we rushed over to Kenny Roger’s “Lion’s Share” studio where Cockburn’s vocal was edited into the audio mix that engineer Humberto Gatica had nearly completed.

“Tears Are Not Enough” reached #1 on the Canadian charts and helped raise more than $3-million for African Famine Relief.

Lyrics and Vocalists

As every day goes by, how can we close our eyes (Gordon Lightfoot)
Until we open up our hearts (Burton Cummings)

We can learn to share and show how much we care (Anne Murray)
Right from the moment that we start (Joni Mitchell)

Seems like overnight, we see the world in a different light (Dan Hill)
Somehow our innocence is lost (Neil Young)

How can we look away, ’cause every single day (Bryan Adams)
We’ve got to help at any cost (Liberty Silver and Loverboy’s Mike Reno)

Chorus (sung by the nine singers above):

We can bridge the distance
Only we can make the difference
Don’t ya know that tears are not enough

If we can pull together
We could change the world forever
Heaven knows that tears are not enough

It’s up to me and you to make the dream come true (Carroll Baker, Ronnie Hawkins, and Murray McLauchlan)
It’s time to take our message everywhere (Corey Hart)

C’est l’amour qui nous rassemble
d’ici a l’autre bout du monde (Véronique Béliveau, Robert Charlebois, and Claude Dubois)

Let’s show them Canada still cares (Bruce Cockburn)
You know that we’ll be there (Rush’s Geddy Lee)

(Chorus – all 18 singers above)

And if we could try (Bryan Adams and Don Gerrard)
Together you and I (All 44 Singers)
Maybe we could understand the reasons why (Zappacosta and Dalbello)
If we take a stand (Rough Trade’s Carole Pope and The Payola$ Paul Hyde)
Every woman, child and man (Salome Bey, Platinum Blonde’s Mark Holmes, and The Parachute Club’s Lorraine Segato)
We can make it work for God’s sake lend a hand (Loverboy’s Mike Reno)

(Chorus – all the above singers plus Paul Anka, Liona Boyd, actor John Candy, Tom Cochrane, Tommy Hunter, Martha Johnson (M+M), actor Eugene Levy, pop pianist Frank Mills, Kim Mitchell, jazz pianist Oscar Peterson, David Letterman sidekick Paul Shaffer, Jane Siberry, Sylvia Tyson (Ian & Sylvia), dj Barry Harris, actress Catherine O’Hara, and Wayne St. John)

The “Tears Are Not Enough” project was one of the finest moments in Canadian music history.

Les Yeux de la Faim

It didn’t receive much attention outside of Quebec but Francophone artists banded together to record an additional charity single for African famine relief. Celine Dion, Rene & Nathalie Simard and others lent their voices to the beautiful “Les Yeux de la Faim“.

Canadian Pride (1985-86)

In the two years following 1984’s dry spell, a total of 50 songs from Canadian artists made the weekly Top 30 National RPM Singles Chart. 1985 was the year that changed everything. Fifteen Canadian artists had Top 30 hits through the year. There were 14 Canadian songs in the year-end Top 100, and the biggest song of the year was Canadian. The year saw three Canadian songs top the charts. And it was the year that witnessed the very first Canadian album certified Diamond. Perhaps the highlight was the coming together of all major Canadian artists to record a charity single for African famine relief. Although the whirlwind that created a swelling of Canadian pride eased up a bit in 1986, it was still a strong year for Canadian music. The RPM Top 100 Year-End Album Charts saw 11 from Canadian artists in 1985 and a dozen in 1986.

1985

At the end of October, 1984, Bryan Adams released his album Reckless and its first single “Run to You”. For some reason, it took some time for the song to climb up the charts, finally cracking the Top 10 on January 12th, 1985. From there, everything snowballed. The album which spawned several additional hits became certified Diamond (1 million copies sold in a country of nearly 26 million at the time) on December 17th. But that wasn’t the only big album that year. Corey Hart released Boy in the Box in mid-June. “Never Surrender” topped the charts and became the biggest song of the year. “Everything in My Heart” was a #1 hit as well (in 1986). And the album became the second in history to attain Diamond sales. Canadian pride soared and the Junos the following year drew a huge audience to see “Never Surrender” win Song of the Year and Reckless win Best Album. Adams and Hart had become national treasures and were the musical heroes that captivated the hearts of the nation.

Canadian artists responded to Bob Geldof’s work with uniting British artists to record “Do They Know It’s Christmas?” to help relieve drought-ridden famine in Ethiopia. They came together as Northern Lights and recorded “Tears Are Not Enough”, another number one single in Canada. We’ll do a special feature on the song in a bit.

Bryan Adams and Corey Hart were not the only names in male singers that year. Scottish-born Torontonian (Lawrence) Gowan scored a #5 hit with “Criminal Mind” from his Strange Animal album (which matched the peak chart position on the album charts). Claude Dubois had a big hit with “Un Chanteur Chant“. Gino Vannelli’s “Black Cars” landed in the Top 5 and his “Huts to Be in Love” the Top 20. Composer and producer David Foster worked heavily on the St. Elmo’s Fire film and his instrumental Love Theme was a Top 10 hit. Paul Janz had his first hit, “Go to Pieces” (#29).

Outside of La Belle Province, the women were nowhere to be heard in ’85, aside from more alternative artists like the creative Jane Siberry (“One More Colour”). Luba made some headways but became a bigger name the following year. The most successful female was Martine St. Clair with her mega-hit “Ce soir l’amour est dans tes yeux”, song of the year winner at the Felix Awards and so irresistible that it was even nominated for a Juno, despite their reputation for snubbing French language music. Nicole Martin’s “Il est en nous l’amour” was nominated for a Felix.

1985 saw the emergence of some huge rock bands, the most notable of which was Platinum Blonde. “Crying over You” was a #1 hit as was their album Alien Shores. Their “Situation Critical” made the Top 10. Vancouver new wave outfit “Strange Advance” scored a minor hit as did Paul Hyde and the Payola$ and newcomers Honeymoon Suite. The latter did better with album sales than hit singles, but nevertheless, scored a Top 10 hit in 1988 with “Love Changes Everything”. Loverboy had a Top 20 hit with “Lovin’ Every Minute of It” and one-hit wonders Idle Eyes with “Tokyo Rose”, but the Parachute Club’s “At the Feet of the Moon” was the most successful, coming just shy of the Top 10. Offenbach and Madame had hits in Québec.

1986

Corey Hart was quick to follow up his Diamond album with Fields of Fire in 1986. The first single “I Am by Your Side” peaked at #12 on the RPM charts, while his cover of “Can’t Help Falling in Love” topped the charts in early ’87. The year, however, belonged to Glass Tiger. Their “Don’t Forget Me (When I’m Gone)” was a number one hit, the 4th biggest of the year and nabbed the Juno Award for Song of the Year. Their 4x Platinum album The Thin Red Line churned out three more hits, all of which broke into the Top 20. A third release came off of Platinum Blonde’s Alien Shores album which was a good thing because it became their only hit south of the border. The song was “Somebody Somewhere”. Honeymoon Suite released a new album—The Big Prize—which spawned two hits that did equally well. The Parachute Club and M+M scored minor hits with “Love Is Fire” and “Song in my Head” respectively. Loverboy’s song “Heaven in your Eyes”, from the Top Gun soundtrack, did moderately well.

There were some newcomers in 1986. Ottawa duo One to One scored a pair of hits from their Forward Your Emotions album. Springing from Talent Quest, Cats Can Fly’s synth-pop “Flippin’ to the ‘A’ Side” peaked at #16. Another synth ensemble—Chalk Circle—came out with “April Fool” that just squeaked into the Top 100 songs of the year. PEI’s Haywire scored with “Bad Bad Boy” and The Partland Brothers (Chris and G.P.) with “Soul City”. Nuance’s “Vivre dans la nuit” sold 70,000 copies and was nominated for Song of the Year at the Junos. Perhaps the most significant addition to 80s bands was Men Without Hats’ new wave spinoff band The Box (“L’affaire Dumoutier”).

Anne Murray crossed over into pop/rock with a comeback hit – “Now and Forever (You and Me)” and Luba became a household name with “How Many (Rivers to Cross)”. Jano Bergeron’s “Recherche” was nominated for a Felix Award. Having departed the band Corbeau, lead singer Marjo embarked on a very successful solo career and won the Félix Song of the Year with “Chats sauvages”. David Foster teamed up with English-Australian diva Olivia Newton-John in “The Best of Me”.

Je voudrais voir New York” was a hit for Daniel Lavoie. Patrick Norman had a stellar year thanks to “Quand on est en amour”. Max Webster’s lead singer Kim Mitchell scored a hit as a soloist called “Patio Lanterns”. And Red Rider’s front man began veering away from the group to lead an even more successful solo career; Tom Cochrane scored a minor hit with “Boy Inside the Man”.

Forthcoming will be a list of Canadian hit singles and albums on the RPM charts in 1985-86; an entry with mini-profiles on semi-major acts The Box, Paul Janz, Haywire, Honeymoon Suite, Luba, Kim Mitchell, Patrick Norman, and Platinum Blonde; a special feature on the making of the “Tears Are Not Enough” charity single; and separate feature profiles on major artists David Foster, Glass Tiger, Gowan, and Marjo.